Research

Special News:

  1. NIH shows promising results on Parkinson’s Disease
  2. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells and Their Application in Cell-Based Tissue Regeneration! A general introduction!
  3. Stem Cell Therapies for Patients with Diabetes
  4. REVERSAL of DIABETES 1 and 2;  View at Publisher of DIABETES 
  5. This is an important article that talks about the activity of Hematopoietic Stem Cell: Self-renewal versus Differentiation. Our stem cell therapy does not only contain Mesenchymal but also Hematopoietic stem cell which can regenerate the immune system. This particularly important in any inflammatory disease such as Arthritis.
  6. Human Stem Cells Fight Parkinson’s Disease in Monkeys

Take a look the Newest Data received from independent Research Labs. Here is a verification of the “stem shot” samples from the University of Utah and Davinci Labs (Aug 2017):

Utah cord bank CFU report

Predictive Altered UoU Report_Side by Side Comparison_29AUG17

Predictive_UoU Cell Viability Report _ ALTERED_18JAN17

_Predictive_UoU Cell Viability Report _ Not Altered_18JAN17

Research Articles

  1. M. Crisan, S. Yap, L. Casteilla et al., “A perivascular origin for mesenchymal stem cells in multiple human organs,” Cell Stem Cell, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 301–313, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
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  3. “Anatomy and pathology of the umbilical cord,” in Pathology of the Human Placenta, K. Benirschke, P. Kaufmann, and R. N. Baergen, Eds., pp. 380–451, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2006.
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  6. H.-S. Wang, S.-C. Hung, S.-T. Peng et al., “Mesenchymal stem cells in the Wharton’s jelly of the human umbilical cord,” STEM CELLS, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 1330–1337, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. K. Batsali, M.-C. Kastrinaki, H. A. Papadaki, and C. Pontikoglou, “Mesenchymal stem cells derived from Wharton’s jelly of the umbilical cord: biological properties and emerging clinical applications,” Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 144–155, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. A. Can and S. Karahuseyinoglu, “Concise review: human umbilical cord stroma with regard to the source of fetus-derived stem cells,” STEM CELLS, vol. 25, no. 11, pp. 2886–2895, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. R. El Omar, J. Beroud, J.-F. Stoltz, P. Menu, E. Velot, and V. Decot, “Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: the new gold standard for mesenchymal stem cell-based therapies?” Tissue Engineering—Part B: Reviews, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 523–544, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. C.-Y. Fong, M. Richards, N. Manasi, A. Biswas, and A. Bongso, “Comparative growth behaviour and characterization of stem cells from human Wharton’s jelly,” Reproductive BioMedicine Online, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 708–718, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. U. Nekanti, V. B. Rao, A. G. Bahirvani, M. Jan, S. Totey, and M. Ta, “Long-term expansion and pluripotent marker array analysis of Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells,” Stem Cells and Development, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 117–130, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. De Kock, M. Najar, J. Bolleyn et al., “Mesoderm-derived stem cells: the link between the transcriptome and their differentiation potential,” Stem Cells and Development, vol. 21, no. 18, pp. 3309–3323, 2012.View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. X. Li, J. Bai, X. Ji, R. Li, Y. Xuan, and Y. Wang, “Comprehensive characterization of four different populations of human mesenchymal stem cells as regards their immune properties, proliferation and differentiation,” International Journal of Molecular Medicine, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 695–704, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
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  15. I. Datta, S. Mishra, L. Mohanty, S. Pulikkot, and P. G. Joshi, “Neuronal plasticity of human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stromal cells to the dopaminergic cell type compared with human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells,” Cytotherapy, vol. 13, no. 8, pp. 918–932, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. M.-Y. Chen, P.-C. Lie, Z.-L. Li, and X. Wei, “Endothelial differentiation of Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells in comparison with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells,” Experimental Hematology, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 629–640, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar ·View at Scopus
  17. L.-F. Wu, N.-N. Wang, Y.-S. Liu, and X. Wei, “Differentiation of Wharton’s jelly primitive stromal cells into insulin-producing cells in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells,” Tissue Engineering Part A, vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 2865–2873, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar ·View at Scopus
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  20. M. Choi, H.-S. Lee, P. Naidansaren et al., “Proangiogenic features of Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells and their ability to form functional vessels,” International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 560–570, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. S. S. Kadam and R. R. Bhonde, “Islet neogenesis from the constitutively nestin expressing human umbilical cord matrix derived mesenchymal stem cells,” Islets, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 112–120, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. V. Sabapathy, B. Sundaram, V. M. Sreelakshmi, P. Mankuzhy, and S. Kumar, “Human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells plasticity augments scar-free skin wound healing with hair growth,” PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 4, Article ID e93726, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. R. Shohara, A. Yamamoto, S. Takikawa et al., “Mesenchymal stromal cells of human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly accelerate wound healing by paracrine mechanisms,” Cytotherapy, vol. 14, no. 10, pp. 1171–1181, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. S. Nascimento, D. Mosqueira, L. M. Sousa et al., “Human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells attenuate remodeling after myocardial infarction by proangiogenic, antiapoptotic, and endogenous cell-activation mechanisms,” Stem Cell Research and Therapy, vol. 5, no. 1, article 5, 2014.View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
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  28. Y. Lin, L. Lin, Q. Wang et al., “Transplantation of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice,” Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 76–86, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. J. M. Santos, R. N. Bárcia, S. I. Simões et al., “The role of human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UCX®) in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis,” Journal of Translational Medicine, vol. 11, article 18, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. A. M. Liu, G. Lu, K. S. Tsang et al., “Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells with forced expression of hepatocyte growth factor enhance remyelination and functional recovery in a rat intracerebral hemorrhage model,” Neurosurgery, vol. 67, no. 2, pp. 357–365, 2010. View at Publisher ·View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. J. Li, C.-Q. Zheng, Y. Li, C. Yang, H. Lin, and H.-G. Duan, “Hepatocyte growth factor gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells augment sinonasal wound healing,” Stem Cells and Development, vol. 24, no. 15, pp. 1817–1830, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
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Advanced Organ Stem Cell Research

These articles are about advanced Organ research that involve the use of a different highly toti-potent stem cell. These are futuristic Medical Applications that do not represent the use of our current multi-potent stem cells. However these articles are included here to show what is possible in the future.

Reconstitute kidney glomerular-capillary-wall function

Generation of a prostate from a single adult stem cell